Freshman Grades – Remix

This is now the 8th year I have published this post for Freshman Gamers.  From what I am hearing — bad_report_cardseveral guys need to ready this a couple of times.

The transition to high school requires – Self Control” and “Intentness” from the Pyramid of Success.  Attend class, learn, hand in assignments and study for tests.

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This post is for all 15u (current high school freshmen).  Parents, please make sure that your son reads this. This is a friendly reminder from the Gamers program that care about you and your success.

Grades matter.  If you want to play college baseball, grades matter A LOT.   Time after time, we see that GPA’s and test scores make the the difference in the college recruiting process.

Now that you are a freshman, your grades now count toward your high school GPA.  Three years from now, you will be filling out college applications.  Every application will ask for your GPA and a copy of your high school transcript.

In baseball, your skill level and athleticism as a Freshman don’t matter a much as your skill & athleticism as a Junior.

Unfortunately, GPA’s are different — they are cumulative.  Sometimes, freshman do not realize this simple fact — your grades as a freshman count JUST AS MUCH as your grades as a junior or senior. 

Here is an example for you.

Say a player gets the following GPA’s:
Freshman – 3.6
Soph – 3.2
Junior – 3.6
Senior – 3.2

The result of this would be an overall GPA of 3.4.  Pretty good (our 15u-17u Gamers have an an average GPA of 3.6).

But, say that same player got a 2.2 GPA his freshman year instead of a 3.6.  (ALL C’s and a couple B’s)

Do you what he would have to achieve during his sophomore, junior and senior years to graduate with the same 3.4 GPA?

To overcome this bad start, he would have to achieve a 3.8 GPA for all three years to pull his overall GPA up to a 3.4 by the end of his senior year.

So, his grades would need to look like this:
Freshman – 2.2
Soph – 3.7
Junior – 3.8
Senior – 3.9

Which scenario looks easier to you?

Don’t put yourself in the situation of playing catch up.  It is hard to do.  Plus, freshman classes are a lot easier than junior and senior classes. It gets harder and harder every year to play catch up.

So, the point of this email is simple — Get off to a good start with grades during your freshman year. 

What are the common excuses that we hear about why players “mess up” during their freshman years?:

– They don’t hand in homework or “projects” (the easiest points to get).
– They procrastinate, waiting until the last minute for assignments and studying
– They have bad study habits (do not use their time efficiently)
– They spend more time on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram…. than on schoolwork
– The are not serious in the classroom, preferring to be the class clown

Essentially, they do not take school seriously and don’t put their best effort forward.  That is not consistent with being a Gamer.

It is now November  You are well into your first semester of high school.  If you are doing well, congratulations and keep up the good work!!

If you are not doing well so far, fix the problem RIGHT NOW.  Talk to guidance counselors, teachers and your parents.  Get a tutor.  Show that YOU CARE.  Fix the problem before it gets too late to impact first semester grades.  Your grades are not going to change unless you change something.  It is your responsibility.

Remember, these grades count and will be with you for the next 3 years. 

If the Gamers coaches or directors can help, let us know.  We see a lot of young men go through this process and know what works.  That is why I am sending out this email.

Getting off to a good start is one of the most important success factors in high school.  It is like throwing a first pitch strike.

Good luck,

Coach Gallion

Roster Size

So, hearing that other local programs are saying that “playing time” and “roster size” is an issue with the Gamers. Might as well address this real clearly.

First, many local baseball team “programs” would never turn away player/parents with a check in their hand.  So, regardless of what they may be saying, their rosters are only limited by people willing to pay.  That’s why they have dozens and dozens of teams.

Second, we have spent a lot of time figuring out the right roster size to insure a good baseball experience for players.  Too many players = not enough playing time.  Too few players = need to “fill-in” with pick-up players and perpetual tryouts.  Don’t be fooled — 9 times out of 10, small roster size on a competitive team means that they are using pick-up players and running perpetual tryouts.

Nothing against pick-up players.  But that is not what the Gamers do (or should be doing).  Many of the lessons from baseball come from being part of a team.  Those lessons are tossed out the window with pick-up players.  Also, it is impossible to teach or coach the Gamers style of play with pick-up players.

For teams that do not care about team lessons and style of play, then I understand why they would have short rosters and use the extra spots for fill-in players to perpetually tryout.  I am amazed by how many young players play for multiple baseball teams.  That’s OK.  But, it is not how the Gamers do it.

Our roster sizes at 14u and above are SMALLER than most nationally competitive teams.  They might be one player more than local teams or two players more than the “pick-up player” teams.  Why does this make sense?

1. We practice more — a lot more

2. We play more, especially at 14u and above

3. We strictly enforce pitch limits — and do not let kids pitch a complete game on Friday and come back and pitch on Sunday.  So, if you plan on playing 2-3 games on Sunday, you have a choice … hurt kids or add another pitcher to the roster.

We could add 3 more roster spots to our teams and Gamers players would still practice more, get better coaching/instruction through the pre-season and in-season program and learn what is means to be part of a team and at the same time develop individually as a player.

I am very comfortable that we have the correct balance on this.

How to Win in Youth Baseball (Hint – the answer is NOT on the scoreboard!)

The “How to Win” formula has been a work in progress for a decade. For a complete ebook on “HOW TO WIN IN YOUTH BASEBALL”, please visit http://gamersacademy.net/win.


We strongly believe that the most important element of youth baseball is teaching kids “how” to succeed. The Gamers program is built around this mission — teaching young men how to recognize and take responsibility for things they can control to be successful. The process of success on the baseball field pays direct dividends in success off the field and in 10 years when young men start making their way in life. Baseball is a PROCESS, not an EVENT.  Although the game seems random at the instance of action, over the long term a series of input factors will control the result.  So, the Formula for Winning is defining the process behind winning, focusing on inputs that are within the control of the player. eck-mainx Over the past 10 years, we have collected and analyzed lots of data and statistics on youth baseball – primarily 12-18u, literally thousands of games. And the introduction of Gamechanger a four years ago makes the collection and analysis of data even easier. To a lot of players, parents and coaches, winning or losing a baseball game seems like a random event, like playing roulette. Our mission has been to teach kids “how” to win – the process of winning. Winning is NOT a random event.


Here is the simple three- part recipe for winning baseball games at the youth level: Win 3 innings (you will win 90% of the game that you achieve this) Have 15 or more Quality At Bats (you will win 80% of the games that you achieve this). Limit Walks + Reached on Errors to 5 or less (you will win 80% of the games that you achieve this) In a single game, if you accomplish 2 of the three above, you will win >90% of the time. If you accomplish all 3 of the above, you will win 98% of the time. It is truly a recipe for winning. It has only happened to me in one in 10 years — where we have accomplished all three goals and lost the game.


I am pretty sure that the same factors hold true in college baseball and professional baseball, but the metrics are different due to 9 inning games and the level of talent. But, the concepts are directly applicable. These three factors give kids simple concepts to focus on. All three are within their immediate control. Winning a game is the result of winning individual battles – one inning at a time, one at bat at a time., one pitch at a time. Each inning, each at bat, each pitch is a battle. Win the individual battles and you will with the game. This is a breakthrough in teaching kids “how” to win a baseball game. And, this approach is directly related to success in life, which is a process that unfolds in a series of daily battles and does not just magically happen.

Click here to get the complete free ebook on How to Win in Youth Baseball.  If you like the ideas, please share with other coaches, parents and players.  The ebook goes through all aspects of the graphic below:

How To Win

How to Win in Youth Baseball (Hint – the answer is NOT on the scoreboard!)

The “How to Win” formula has been a work in progress for a decade. For a complete ebook on “HOW TO WIN IN YOUTH BASEBALL”, please visit http://gamersacademy.net/win.


We strongly believe that the most important element of youth baseball is teaching kids “how” to succeed. The Gamers program is built around this mission — teaching young men how to recognize and take responsibility for things they can control to be successful. The process of success on the baseball field pays direct dividends in success off the field and in 10 years when young men start making their way in life. Baseball is a PROCESS, not an EVENT.  Although the game seems random at the instance of action, over the long term a series of input factors will control the result.  So, the Formula for Winning is defining the process behind winning, focusing on inputs that are within the control of the player. eck-mainx Over the past 10 years, we have collected and analyzed lots of data and statistics on youth baseball – primarily 12-18u, literally thousands of games. And the introduction of Gamechanger a four years ago makes the collection and analysis of data even easier. To a lot of players, parents and coaches, winning or losing a baseball game seems like a random event, like playing roulette. Our mission has been to teach kids “how” to win – the process of winning. Winning is NOT a random event.


Here is the simple three- part recipe for winning baseball games at the youth level: Win 3 innings (you will win 90% of the game that you achieve this) Have 15 or more Quality At Bats (you will win 80% of the games that you achieve this). Limit Walks + Reached on Errors to 5 or less (you will win 80% of the games that you achieve this) In a single game, if you accomplish 2 of the three above, you will win >90% of the time. If you accomplish all 3 of the above, you will win 98% of the time. It is truly a recipe for winning. It has only happened to me in one in 10 years — where we have accomplished all three goals and lost the game.


I am pretty sure that the same factors hold true in college baseball and professional baseball, but the metrics are different due to 9 inning games and the level of talent. But, the concepts are directly applicable. These three factors give kids simple concepts to focus on. All three are within their immediate control. Winning a game is the result of winning individual battles – one inning at a time, one at bat at a time., one pitch at a time. Each inning, each at bat, each pitch is a battle. Win the individual battles and you will with the game. This is a breakthrough in teaching kids “how” to win a baseball game. And, this approach is directly related to success in life, which is a process that unfolds in a series of daily battles and does not just magically happen.

Click here to get the complete free ebook on How to Win in Youth Baseball.  If you like the ideas, please share with other coaches, parents and players.  The ebook goes through all aspects of the graphic below:

How To Win

Duck Dynasty Beards, Hair and Entertainers

Click on Image to Explore MLB and WWE Grooming

Click on Image to Explore MLB and WWE Grooming

Given the popularity of the MLB and associated video games, fantasy leagues and 24/7 coverage, baseball at that level is as much about entertainment as it is about the actual game.  If WWE is 100% entertainment, then NFL is 60% and MLB is now 50%.  There is nothing wrong with this, because MLB has been able to keep the game relatively pure and without a doubt puts the best players in the world on the field, competing very hard 162 games a year.  The quality of MLB baseball is lot better than the quality of WWE wrestling.

But, the 50% entertainment part is hard to miss:

– Crazy beards

– Crazy hair

– Full body tattoos, etc…

Players want to develop an image, be noticed and standout in the entertainment business.  Goofy hair and crazy beards is an easy way to stand out and establish your entertainment brand.  Hey, look at me.  It makes perfect sense and it works.  It always has worked — from 1960’s rock to the WWE and now to MLB players.  From Al Hrabosky to Brian Wilison — this is not new.

If I was being paid a lot of money to play baseball, and was focused on my personal entertainment brand, I would probably do the same thing.

But, if you are not in the entertainment business, if you are just playing baseball to compete and get better and have fun, it makes little sense to have long hair and Duck Dynasty beards.  It is a summer sport.  It is impractical and lacks common sense to have long hair and a DD beard when competing for 2 hours in 90+ degree sunshine.  Long hair in football may be OK for NFL players looking to standout on the field of entertainment and on Madden 2014, but long hair hanging out of a football helmet incredibly impractical and frankly stupid. DD beards and long hair in baseball are not much different.

So, here is the problem … I am starting to look around and see too many players and coaches in the amateur baseball world imitating MLB entertainers in the area of personal grooming.  Amateur baseball is not entertainment.  It is impractical to have long hair and crazy beards in an amateur dugout.  Seeds sticking in long beards just looks stupid.  When I see coaches wearing Evoshield wristbands, I laugh at them.  What’s the point?  Same thing goes for paid coaches with crazy beards and long hair.  If you are getting paid (anything) to be a baseball coach or are coaching baseball at a high level, there is no reason to have long hair and a crazy beard.

It sends the wrong message.  Amateur baseball is not about entertainment or personal branding.

Obviously, amateur baseball players/coaches will do whatever they want to do and I respect their right to do that.  But, if you want to standout and be noticed for personal grooming habits, you have to recognize that people are going to ask the “What’s the point”.  And, the answer is sometimes pretty obvious.

Hitting Adjustments

It is really hard to be a consistently good hitter.  At the 14-17u levels that our teams play at, the metrics for an elite hitter are >.450 OBP and >.350 batting average.  For a good hitter, it is >.400 OBP and >.300 batting average. Note — this is after about 100 plate appearances, so don’t freak out or celebrate for another 2 months.

To accomplish this level of performance requires consistent effort and competing in EVERY  at bat (i.e. not giving away at-bats).  If you give away at-bats when your team is up 6-1 or down 5-1, you are not going to achieve this level of performance.

Good hitters have a plan when they step into the batters box.  What is your plan?  In general, it should be “Get a good pitch and square it up”.   But, what is your hitting approach in more detail?

Well, the answer should be “it depends …. on the situation”.

Runner on 2nd, no outs => your job is to advance the runner unless you are getting paid to play baseball.

Runner on 3rd, less than 2 outs => your job is to to get a good pitch to hit and hammer it.

Two strikes => your job is to shorten up, let the ball travel and battle your butt off to eat up pitches or get the pitcher to make a mistake.

So, your detailed approach is that it “Depends on the situation”  

It also depends on the count.

Adjust to count

And, it depends on the type of pitcher you are facing.

Adjust to Pitchers

Here was a summary from a weekend this past summer:

In Game 1 this weekend, we faced two guys that were #1’s and we kept taking strike one fastballs.  We took 14 strike one fastballs.   You cannot do that against #1 guys. They have good stuff and they are not going to walk you. The strike 1 fastball is the best pitch you are going to see.  Sit on it and compete.  You need to take these match-ups personally as a hitter.  Your future in baseball depends on beating #1 guys.

In Game 3, we faced a struggling pitcher for 3 innings and scored only 6 runs.  In those situations, we need to step on the gas and relentlessly hit and walk our way to double digit runs.  But, we starting refusing to walk and got ourselves out by swinging at bad pitches.

Then, in Game 3, we faced a crafty pitcher who got ahead in the count and then made us look foolish.  We tried to hit the ball in the air with a 30mph wind blowing out.  Instead, we fouled balls off early in the count then chased bad pitches.  The result, was 3 innings and zero runs against a pitcher throwing 70 against the wind.

As the season progresses, we need to understand what kind of pitcher we are facing and how we need to adjust our approach immediately.  Let’s not wait until the post-game talk to discuss adjustments.

Working the Count

Below is a chart of data of MLB on-base percentage as hitters pass through different counts.  Of course, everyone starts at 0-0, so the MLB OB% average is .324 (note there are some quirks in this data and it is a couple decades old, but conclusions are right).

If the result of pitch 1 is a ball, then the batters on-base % goes to .387.  If the result is strike 1, then the on-base % goes to .256.  That is a HUGE DIFFERENCE and sets up the rest of the rest of the at-bat.  You can see how the results further diverge as the counts play out.

The different between the upper right 1/2 of the box and the lower left 1/2 of the box is the difference between scoring 2 runs a game or 7 runs a game.  Pitchers need to throw strikes early, hitters need to swing at strikes early.  That creates a perfect match-up!

OBP vs Count

Adjustments to 60/90 Fields — 4 Things That Work

One of the reasons I enjoy 14u baseball is watching the transition to a big diamond.  Compared to 13u baseball, pitchers are throwing 6 ft. further, bases are 10 ft. further and throws are 10-20 feet longer.  Then, you add -3 BBCOR bats to the mix.  A lot of things in flux.

Players need to get good at making adjustments at this age.

Here are four things that work in making this transition.

1, Pitchers need to challenge hitters to put the ball in play.  It is harder to get a hit at this age — fielders are fast and no one can outrun a baseball. Challenge hitters and see what happens.

2. Infielders need to move through the ball. Bad footwork will not work on a big field.

3. Hitters need to attack the inside half of the ball and go gap-t0-gap and opposite field.  You are going to be out front and rollover 10X more than you are going to get beat by a 14u fastball.

4. The value of speed and good base running just got amplified.  If that is part of your game, push things hard.  If speed is not part of your game, then get to at least average speed and quickness and become a great baserunner.  It makes a difference.

Good news is that the fields are not getting any bigger from now on.  This is it.  This is a good time to make the adjustments.

Surprising Seven Secrets about College Prep Baseball

harvard-business-school-5.4 Three key factors drive the college baseball process for high school age players:

1. Talent/Skill level – basically you need to look the part and be able to play.

2. Good grades – a lot more important than most people realize

3. Being a “good kid” – hard worker, committed, able to overcome failure, coachable, etc.. (i.e. are you a Gamer?)

The only thing a college prep, select baseball program can do for you is to help you develop along those three dimensions and to give you the opportunity to play in front of college coaches.  NO COLLEGE PREP BASEBALL PROGRAM “GETS” YOU A COLLEGE BASEBALL SCHOLARSHIP!! (this is secret #1 – don’t tell anyone) College prep programs either help you directly with a these three things or they don’t.  If they don’t then … ?

If you are 6’3″, throw 89, have a 29 ACT and are good kid => you are going to play at a high-end Division 1 program.  Of course, it is a very competitive world and there are literally hundreds of HS players out there that fit this criteria. If you are in this group, congratulations!  There are a lot of people lined up to take credit for your success.

Here is surprising secret #2 : for the clear, high-end D1 players… your actual success in college (i.e. actual playing time, having on-field success, having off-field success and graduating) will depend almost entirely on #2 & #3 above, not #1 that you are being recruited for. This is why so many highly recruited and early-commit players do not make it through (or to) college, switch programs after one year, etc..  This is why a lot of D1 recruits get passed by before they even show up on campus.  A lot of SEC recruits never play in the SEC.  This is especially true for players who look the part and matured early but were never challenged or taught the importance of #2 and #3.

So, the long-term success of the high-end D1 recruits will depend primarily on how good of a student they are and if they are a “good kid”.  This is very counter-intuitive and very top-secret.  Many high-end D1 program have bullpens & benches  full of kids that throw 90+, but cannot get outs or hit curve balls or are academically ineligible.

But, the clear high-end D1’s do not represent most players in college prep, select baseball.  The majority of players are either borderline D1 players, or are more likely to play at D2/D3/NAIA or Juco.  That is right — the majority of players playing college prep, select baseball are not going to play high-end D1 baseball.   (that is secret #3). This is true for almost EVERY program in the country — maybe 8-10 total exceptions across the country (you can usually find one in our pool at East Cobb).

In the Gamers program, 90% of our players go on to play college baseball.  But, a little less than 1/2 go to D1 baseball programs.  It sometimes changes year to year, some years 60%, some years 40%.  But on average, a little less the 50% over 6 years of graduating players to college baseball.

So, here is a surprising secret #4 for this majority of players … the NCAA level of the baseball program DOES NOT MATTER nearly as much as whether the college is a GOOD FIT with your overall goals.  


Here is some good info on college baseball “fit”:
college fit


The single most important goals for you are to:

– use baseball to learn what it takes to be successful in life

– recruit yourself into a baseball program that fits with your academic and baseball levels — i.e. where you “fit”

– have a great college athletic and academic experience

That should be the focus for every player, but especially the players that do not fit clear high-end D1 profiles.

The misguided notion that Division 1 baseball is always the best option is flat-out wrong for LOTS of players.  

Here is surprising secret #5 …. At the end of 4-5 years, a player that goes to a high-end academic D3 college and plays baseball is usually BETTER OFF than a player that goes to a high-end D1 baseball program.  Not always, but most of the time.  

Degrees from schools like MIT, DePauw, Rhodes, Wheaton, Wash U, etc.. matter A LOT.  Some of these academic experiences are life altering.  These degrees matter more than Division 1 baseball.  If you play baseball and successfully graduated rom a college like this, you will have great opportunities in front of you.

The chances of ever earning a living playing baseball are REMOTE (is there a way to make this text larger? — this is secret #6). What matters is having a good experience, developing as a person and emerging from college with the capacity to succeed in life.

I have incredible respect and affection and am VERY proud of the handful of former Gamers now earning a pay check in professional baseball.   They are awesome young men.  But, I am equally proud of the kids that played college baseball and are graduating from great schools with good degrees that set them up for success in life.

Finally — secret #7 — this process is not about baseball.  This is about learning how to work hard at something, fail, get back on your feet and keep working. It is about learning how to succeed.  Baseball is simply the best platform invented to teach this to young men.

Are Club Sports Evil?

Sandlot1I am not happy with the anti-club sport mantra that has emerged as conventional wisdom in the sports media.  Here is one of the milder examples recently re-circulated by the ABCA:

https://businessjournalism.org/2015/03/sports-money-cost-specialization/

The article is titled “Sports and Money” to fit with the storyline that it is “all about the money”.  I rarely post comments on articles, but I did this time.

I am not sure why some professional athletes and coaches are playing along with this.  My speculation is that they are out of touch with the competition level in HS sports OR are just parroting something that sounds good and people seem to want to hear. But to me, it sounds a little like “I was so good I didn’t need club sports.  I just played in the sandlot with Smalls, Squints and Bennie.”  Well, that was a long time ago.

Here is the comment I posted:

24 March, 2015, 14:45

I find the line of thought, now conventional wisdom that:

a. Travel, club sport coaches and paid instructors are evil

b. Parents who choose to spend discretionary money on sports training are short-sighted and/or are fools

c. Sport specialization is contributing to injuries

d. Young players are somehow victims in the process

to be out of touch with reality, with heads firmly planted ostrich-style in holes.

The world is different now than it was 20 years ago — sorry John Kruk and Curt Schilling. It is a lot smaller world, if you have not noticed.

Players, starting around high school age, figure out if they are pretty good or not at a sport. If they are pretty good, they often want to play the sport a lot, at the highest level they can. They don’t want to just compete with kids in a 50 mile radius. They want to compete against the best from 500 miles, or more. What is wrong with that?

(Please note that I am referring to young men in the HS age group — not elementary and middle schoolers.)

Go check out some HS age competition that is based on a 500 mile radius. You have to be incredibly talented to be on that field. Average does not get you on that field. Kids that want to play on that field know that it is not easy. They are pretty smart.

So, the counter argument is this — “no, little Johnny, let’s be average at three local sports instead of exceptional at the regional level at the one sport that you really like.”

That decision is really up to little Johnny since he has to do all the hard work. And, he probably makes the right decision 95% of the time.

Given the player’s desires, parents with discretionary income then spend money to train their young athletes to compete against the top kids from 500 miles around. That’s what parents do if they can. 95% of the time this represents a significant commitment on the part of the parents to allow their kid to achieve something he/she wants to do. It is players pulling, not parents pushing 95% of the time … especially at high school ages.

Travel, club programs and professional instructors emerged because players/parents want their services and they enjoy working with young people. 95% of these coaches/instructors are incredibly dedicated, good people that do not get paid that much and are great mentors to young men and women. What is wrong with this?

The conventional wisdom implies that the club sport world is supply driven.  Somehow, a mass conspiracy formed to convince parents and young players to pay for something they do not need or want.  Like pet rocks and sea monkeys.   That is very wrong.

This market is demand driven — driven by young athletes that want to compete at a high level.  Young athletes want to be trained and developed to compete at a high level.   Their parents think that is a worthy endeavor and support it.  That is why club sports exist 95% of the time.  It is demand, not supply.

95% of players are not victims, 95% parents are not stupid and 95% of coaches/instructors are not “all about the money”.

When people use that phrase, I think they should be forced to set in a dugout with 15 year olds for 2 hours.  It is NOT all about the money 95% of the time.

Finally, the injury point. Guess what — if you play sports at a higher and higher level, the risk of physical injury goes up. When you run faster, are bigger, throw harder and hit harder, you are more likely to get hurt. Why is that such a big surprise to everyone?

The chances of an arm injury throwing 90 are a lot higher that the chances of an injury throwing 75. Good players playing at a very physically challenging level tend to get hurt more. People are now actually writing books and making speeches on this absolutely obvious fact.

The only true way to avoid sports injuries is to not play.  Playing more, harder and faster leads to more injuries.  How’s that for stunning insight.

So, do we tell players to throw easier and run slower? To not compete as hard? That’s just not the way young athletes think.

The entire argument against sports specialization and club sports is focused on the 5% …

… the 5% of players who really do want to play 3 sports but are forced into playing one …

… the 5% of parents who are re-living their own lives through their kids or are being fed BS by coaches/instructors …

… the 5% of coaches/instructors who are in it for the money and do not live up to their end of the bargain …

.. the 5% of coaches that put players at risk for injury by improper warm-up, improper training or letting them continue playing when the risk for injury goes up …

OK maybe its 10%, not 5%. But it is not even close to 50%.

The days of 3 sport athletes dominating their 50 mile radius is LONG GONE … disappearing about the same time as cell phones and the internet made our world a lot smaller.  In a lot of areas, it was gone before that.  In European soccer is disappeared 5 decades ago.

Club sports and specialization (at HS ages) are not going away. It is a natural and healthy evolution, 95% of the time. Let’s focus on fixing the 5% instead of telling players not to play hard, work hard and have lofty goals, or telling parents not to spend time and money on their kids, or telling coaches not to coach.

Because, I am pretty sure that is not going to happen.